What is my aim?

Weeding. If there ever was an unending job, this is it. The weeds in my garden were thick. And plentiful. The truism states that the best way to root out weeds is, well, by the roots. Yet, the longer I worked, the hotter it became, the more tired my fingers grew, the prospect of just ripping off the green was tempting. “I can grab a whole handful and be done with this,” I thought. My work became sloppy, and my goal shifted from quality to being satisfied with surface-level appearances. Continue reading

A Well-Lived Life

I have had the pleasure (and the frustration, at times) of living in both rural and urban locales during my life. As I’ve done some pondering during these beginning stages of CarePoint, some important aspects seem to be reflected in these rural and urban settings – urban environments create the possibility of greater community while rural environments create the possibility of greater reflection. It is both of these – community and reflection – that we believe are essential to a well-lived life. Without community, we are in danger of going astray or becoming self-focused. There is a strong possibility that we end up justifying or rationalizing our behaviors because we lack accountability. Without reflection, though, we are in danger of pursuing things like a dog pursuing the next squirrel. Here, the ditch we might fall into is sacrificing depth by filling our lives to (or even, beyond) the brim. Both of these paths leave us living a superficial life.

Here’s where CarePoint comes in. In our own lives, we have found it beneficial to have someone objective to walk alongside us or to lean on when the silence or loneliness is too heavy a burden. As such, we believe that the process of reflecting and opening ourselves up to others (i.e. living in community) can be healing, encouraging, and strengthening. Continue reading